The Benefits of a Remote Business With No Fixed Address

remote business

More and more businesses are choosing to go (or even start) remote. But what does running a remote business mean for you by way of benefits. Is it better? Worse? There are definitely benefits of running a remote business — here are the best ones.

Lower Overhead Costs

If you’re a solopreneur or small business owner just starting up then one of the biggest benefits of running a remote business for you is going to be the fact that you save significantly on the overhead costs.

Not only that but in most jurisdictions running a business out of your house means cutting your personal costs. I write off a portion of my rent, electricity, internet and phone bill.

Running a remote business has a lot of benefits in my mind, but the most prominent one as the solopreneur and owner of a small but growing business is the cut on my personal bills and the fact that I don’t have to add those business expenses to my budget.

Access To Your Ideal Workers

Running a remote business means that when it comes to hiring someone to help you with your business — whether they’re an employee, contractor or otherwise — you have access to a much wider talent pool. Worldwide even!

When it comes to running your small remote business, you need the best talent to help you grow. And finding the best talent is much easier (though possibly more time consuming) when you have access to the exact talent and specializations that you need.

Having access to a much wider talent pool means that you can pick out the perfect fit in personality, talent, and experience for your remote business. And fill your team as you grow with the best of the best!

Flexibility Means Greater Productivity

I’ve personally worked in-house in an office, remotely as an in-house worker and for myself and I can tell you one thing — when my schedule is more flexible, I am way more productive.

Having a flexible workspace and time means that I can work when and where I’m most productive. Whereas a traditional workplace requires a 9-to-5 model, I can get an entire day’s work done in half the time if I work at the right time.

For me, working at the right time means clocking in during the evening. What might take me an hour-and-a-half to do at 1 p.m., takes me half that at 9 p.m. Why? I seriously have no idea. But knowing that means that I can hack my work day to get the best results for me and my little remote business.

When you run a remote business, it’s important for you to not only work when you work best. But also let those that help you run and grow your business work when they’re the most productive — pending you can — because you’ll end up growing at a much more efficient rate!

Better Opportunity To Scale

Most small business owners and entrepreneurs are thinking about scalability when it comes to their business, as they should be. And running a remote business means that you have greater scalability access.

Scalability, in this sense, is really the access to reduced overhead costs so you presumably have more access to cash flow and a good talent pool that you can take from. Running a remote business gives you access to both of these.

Fewer Watercooler Distractions

There are a lot of distractions around the office. I think back to my time working in a traditional office and wonder how I got anything done by the number of people that stopped by for a chat, trapped me in the kitchen and just wanted to meet for a minute. Running a remote business means you and those you hire to help you are all presumably in areas where the distractions are fewer and farther between.

That said, working from home means there is a whole host of new distractions in a home office. My dog, for example, insists on getting a pet a few times a day and I typically stop to actually cook a full lunch and dinner which takes more time than your usual food court run —  but in comparison, working remotely means I get more done and have fewer distractions!

Should I Run a Remote Business?

Deciding to run a remote business depends on a number of factors. Where are your clients? What industry are you in? How do you work with clients and get the job done? These are all things you need to think about.

If you’re running a small family law firm, then chances are working remotely isn’t going to work for you — at least not all the time. But if you’re running a coaching business or a blog then go for it!

You need to make the right decision for you and your business, so you have the best chance to get ahead and grow!

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